Giant Hyssop


Sow: February to May

Flowers: June to October

Where:  In a sunny spot. Large containers, cottage garden, wildlife garden, herb garden, vegetable patch, borders and flower beds.

How many seeds?  0.04g (average 100 seeds)

Also known as: Agastache rugosa, Wrinkled Giant Hyssop, Korean Hyssop, Purple Giant Hyssop, Korean Mint, Blue Liquorice, Huo xiang, Indian Mint, Patchouli Herb

Giant Hyssop

Giant hyssop is a perennial but is most often grown as a half-hardy annual. It has edible leaves and flowers which taste like a combination of mint and aniseed, with the leaves generally being sweeter tasting than the leaves. The most common use of both the leaves and flowers is to make a floral tea. Giant hyssop may also be used to make flavoured sugars, butters, oils and vinegars as well as being used in a wide variety of dishes including salads, pasta dishes, with vegetables and with fruit.

Presentation Pack includes:-
Hyssop Seed
Growing & Harvesting Hyssop Flower Instructions
Hyssop Flower Eating Guide
Hyssop FlowerRecipe Leaflet
Edible Flower Recipe Cards incl:
How to edible flower oils and vinegars
How to make floral ice bowls and cubes
Plant Label

Refill Packs include:-Flower Seeds only

£2.95£4.95

Clear

Additional Information

Growing Location

Vegetable Gardens, Containers, Borders & beds, Small gardens, Wildlife garden

Growing Condition

Full sun

Use

Seasoning, Decoration & garnishes, Hot drinks, Cold drinks, Cakes & desserts, Savoury cooking, Oils & vinegars, Sugars & syrups

Sowing month

February, March, April, May, October

Flowering month

June, July, August, September, October

Taste

Savoury, Sweet

Colour

Blue, Purple

Type of packet

Seed & Recipe Pack, Seed Refill Pack

Product Description

Giant hyssop

Giant hyssop is a perennial edible but is most often grown as a half-hardy annual. It has edible leaves and flowers which taste like a combination of mint and aniseed, with the leaves generally being sweeter tasting than the leaves. The most common use of both the leaves and flowers is to make a floral tea. Giant hyssop may also be used to make flavoured sugars, butters, oils and vinegars as well as being used in a wide variety of dishes including salads, pasta dishes, with vegetables and with fruit.Giant hyssop is a perennial but is most often grown as a half-hardy annual. It has edible leaves and flowers which taste like a combination of mint and aniseed, with the leaves generally being sweeter tasting than the leaves. The most common use of both the leaves and flowers is to make a floral tea. Giant hyssop may also be used to make flavoured sugars, butters, oils and vinegars as well as being used in a wide variety of dishes including salads, pasta dishes, with vegetables and with fruit.

Also known as: Agastache rugosa, Wrinkled Giant Hyssop, Korean Hyssop, Purple Giant Hyssop, Korean Mint, Blue Liquorice, Huo xiang, Indian Mint, Patchouli Herbflowers

Looking for more inspiration?.....

....see our boards on pinterest for ideas on how to use your edible flowers